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O'Reilly Software Architecture Conference: My ping from London

O'Reilly Software Architecture Conference: My ping from London

I attended O’Reilly’s Software Architecture Conference in London this October and I thought I’d share my personal wrap-up of the most striking talks I’ve heard there. So buckle up for a tiny race through three days of talks and workshops: sarahjwells from Financial Times gave a great advice on how to fight code rot in your microservice architecture: Consider building overnight to fight code rot and keep services live and healthy.

Setting sails - I'm joining Hermes Germany in October

Setting sails - I'm joining Hermes Germany in October

I’ve worked for Just Software as a Software Developer for seven years and seven months this month. It was one of the most intense periods of my life, not only personally but also as a developer, an employee, a colleague, a consultant and an Open Source enthusiast. The time at that awesome company has shaped me extremely and I’m leaving my team there with mixed feelings. We left the shores of our safe jobs to build the best team collaboration software in the world.

[Update] Are GitHubbers taking open source seriously?

[Update] Are GitHubbers taking open source seriously?

Simon Phipps of Open Source fame at Sun and the Open Source Initiative wrote an interesting article titled GitHub needs to take open source seriously. He warns about the fact, that GitHub doesn’t have a mechanism that lets new projects choose a proper license for their work. Simon also cites a survey that says this: […] as many as half [of the projects] include no easily identifiable copyright licensing information.

What I've read - Week 42/13

Actually this is my reading list from the last several weeks. I haven’t had the time to write these down, though, since we were preparing for ICNP 2013. Since me and my teammate are developing an overlay P2P network for Browsers we are especially interested in implementation patterns for such overlays. One very well-known paper is the one from Dabek et al. titled “Towards a Common API for Structured Peer-to-Peer Overlays”.

What I've read - Week 38/13

This week I stumbled across an interesting overview paper by Srinivasan Keshav (author of “Mathematical Foundations of Computer Networking”, which I already own since some days): Naming, Addressing, and Forwarding Reconsidered The paper provides the reader with an easy to understand and profound overview of how entities (Internet computers, mailboxes, phones) are addressed. Keshav introduces the concept of location independent identifiers (LII) and location specific identifiers (LSI). The separation of LII and LSI allows for a better understanding of how an indirection (e.

[Update] The quest for a suitable device to read PDFs

[Update] The quest for a suitable device to read PDFs

Still having some time left in this summer break I started a little side project: I will try to find the best device for reading PDFs – especially scientific papers. Why? Because I don’t want to print out every paper I may (or may not, in the end) read for ecological and economical reasons. (This post will be updated with my latest results from time to time.) I’ll try to narrow down the slippery word best from above:

Migration to Jekyll - my new Blog system

This blog has been hosted on Google’s Blogger platform ever since its incarnation. The decision to use Blogger was a quite hasty one and I was never really satisfied by how Blogger works. But as many of you probably have already experienced, once you decide in favor of a piece of software you can’t change that easily. It’s not that my blog was locked-in on Blogger’s features or something. In fact it just worked and I had no real incentive to take the time for evaluating alternatives.

Why I love Free Software

Why I love Free Software

Today is Valentine’s day and I take the opportunity to follow the Free Software Foundation’s call to spread my love for Free Software. I love Free Software! Usually people argue about using Free Software with technical or cost-related benefits like you’re able to look into the source code, incorporate your patches immediately or don’t have to pay any license fees. All of this is true, naturally, but I love Free Software for many more of its benefits.

Speaking at FrOSCon 2012 - Q&A

Speaking at FrOSCon 2012 - Q&A

Last weekend I had the honour of speaking at the Free and Open Source Software Conference again (after having talked there last year and in 2006) which took place at my alma mater for the 7th time now. The title of the talk was “conquering the mobile web: leverage standard technologies - gain extraordinary results” and it was great fun again. Talking at a conference is - at least for me - quite stressful since I’m really eager to deliver a talk which introduces the audience to something new while at the same time delivering it so that people have fun listening.

Webchan.nl - web push for the rest of us

About a month ago, I finally had the time to publish a small side-project of mine: https://webchan.nl. Webchan.nl is a simple service that everyone can use to augment a website with push notifications. You simply include a small JavaScript file in your web pages that connects to the Webchan.nl server, reserves a channel and receives messages from that channel. From that point on your server-side components can push to that channel any information you want your users to see in realtime.